The Pakistani military fired more than 100 missiles into the Kunar province of eastern Afghanistan prior to Eid and throughout the holiday. A 12-year old boy was killed, a 13-year old boy was severely injured, and several damages were imposed on the people of Kunar, according to Kunar Police Chief Abdul Habib Sayedkhili. In addition, Pakistani soldiers crossed the Durand Line (Afghanistan-Pakistan border) earlier today (July 30, 2014) and went 12 kilometers into Afghanistan where they established check posts (updates yet to come). The Pakistani military established similar check posts in the Goshta district of Nangarhar province (eastern Afghanistan) last year, which resulted in clashes between Afghan and Pakistani soldiers, claiming the lives of many people. [x]



WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN.
Photograph by Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images. 

WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN.

Photograph by Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images



mehreenkasana:

Here’s the thing. If you denounce the genocide in Palestine under jingoistic Israeli flag-waving (which you should; anyone with a conscience and a spine would), you will also denounce the systemic dispossession of those in Waziristan. I am not drawing parallel between the violence employed here; it isn’t possible because the nature varies, the context is separate for each. At one side, we have Zionism and on the other side, we have US-funded and US-PK collaborated Pakistani praetorianism that centers its viciousness on Waziris as well as Afghans particularly in the eastern province of Afghanistan. We all know very well how Pashtuns in both countries are often relentlessly stereotyped as “extremists.” This is exceptionally obvious in the jurisprudence of Pakistan in specific.

You cannot practice selective morality. It is not easy to look back home and see how fragmented and violently unpredictable life is for certain Pakistanis (you can pick up the case of Waziris at the moment or Ahmadis or any other marginalized group) but it is imperative that we begin some collective reflection. It is more than evident - and has been so for decades now - that some Pakistanis are not treated as citizens of the “land of pure” and as long as we neglect the question of those Pakistanis and their fate, we are only posturing about other issues. There will be no social awakening, much less this fantasy of a brotherhood, until we look into our own home.



um-er:

um-er:

warkadang:

It breaks my heart knowing that silence is preferred over the attacks on Afghan civilians by the Pakistani military, not only this week, but for the past seven years. There are many injustices in the world that are casually ignored and the killing of civilians in eastern Afghanistan is one of…

This is so misleading and biased, where’s the other side of the story? The Afghan’s have been violating the Pakistani border since 1947. There have been so many cases of the Afghan Army and the Afghan backed militants crossing the border and slaughtering Pakistani Army soldiers and FC Personnel. Moreover you conveniently failed to mention how the Afghans have always been sheltering and aiding separatist movements in Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtukhawa.

However the killing of innocent civilians anywhere in the world is deplorable.

Latest example: 80 Militants attacked a Pakistani check post from the Afghan side of the border.

There is no “other side of the story”. This isn’t a two-sided conflict. The Pakistani military builds Pakistani check posts on Afghan soil. They violate Afghan airspace with their jets. They launch airstrikes and fire missiles on Afghan villages in eastern Afghanistan under the U.S.-backed Af-Pak policy, which justifies the killing of Afghan civilians. Afghanistan has done NONE of these things. I challenge you to find any article that says so. If you are offended that the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) responds to Pakistan’s attacks on Afghan soil, then you need to re-evaluate your morals. Self-defense is a given right to anyone who are unjustly attacked, in this case when Afghanistan once in a while responds to Pakistan’s attacks on eastern Afghanistan. 

You claim that Afghans have been violating the border with Pakistan since 1947. What do you mean by that? For instance, there were no militant groups in Afghanistan at that time, so they were for sure not militants. And unless you can provide proof that Afghanistan unjustly attacked or violated the border with Pakistan in 1947, I’m going to stick to my source. Because the earliest known Afghanistan-Pakistan border attack happened in 1949, when a Pakistani Air Force plane bombed an Afghan village (as ordered by the Pakistani government) just across the border to suppress tribal uprising against the colonial Afghanistan-Pakistan border, known as the Durand line, which separates colonized Afghan territories from the rest of Afghanistan. This was only one of the many acts the Pakistani government did to suppress Pashtun separatism. In response to the bombing, Afghanistan called for a loya jirga meeting and agreed to never officially recognize the Durand line. 

In the link you posted of the “latest attack from Afghanistan”, you forgot to mention that the militants who attacked the Pakistani check post from Afghanistan were Pakistani militants. They’re from Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP). Are you seriously going to blame Afghanistan for what militants, specifically what Pakistani militants are doing in our land? That tells me you’re only looking for a way to point fingers at Afghanistan. What militants - both Afghan and Pakistani - do in Afghanistan or Pakistan is not in the hands of the Afghan government (nor are the militants “backed” by the Afghan government, like you said). Just like the Pakistani governent has no control over militants, the Afghan government has no control over militants. But what the Pakistani military does to Afghanistan, is in the hands of the Pakistani government. So it makes NO sense at all to blame Afghanistan for what militants, and in this case what Pakistani militants do. But it does make sense to hold the Pakistani government accountable for what it orders its military to do. 

Lastly, meanwhile you thought you had made some good and sharp points, the Pakistani military fired more than 100 missiles into the Kunar province of eastern Afghanistan prior to and throughout Eid, in which a 12-year old boy was killed and several damages were imposed on civilians. I’m sure you’ll find a way to justify this too, because Afghans mean nothing to you. They’re like dirt under your feet, right? Your genocidal military is more important to you than the lives Afghan children. Don’t you have any shame? You commented on a post specifically about the lives of Afghan civilians being ignored, and instead of having some respect and decency, you defended a genocidal military that is responsible for the rapes and murders of thousands of Bengalis, Afghans, Pashtuns and Balochis. You are no better than a patriotic American in support of the U.S. military. 



naazaneen:

Protest in Afghanistan against the Taliban and the recent massacre of Hazaras in ghor

Details on the massacre:

On July 25, 2014, Taliban militants executed 15 civilians who were travelling in two vehicles. The militants made the vehicles pull over and ordered everyone out, after which they lined the passengers up on the side of the road and shot them one by one. One passenger managed to flee, but the rest were found dead with bullets in their heads and chests. Eleven men, a child and three women were killed. 

All of the victims were ethnic Hazaras, a minority group long persecuted by the Taliban. According to the Ghor Police Chief, the victims were killed by Taliban militants who had been freed from prison in Ghor. And according to Muhammad Nader Ehsani, a religious scholar participating in the Ghor demonstration on Saturday, every victim had over 100, 70 or 60 bullets rammed into their bodies. 

(via churayl)



It breaks my heart knowing that silence is preferred over the attacks on Afghan civilians by the Pakistani military, not only this week, but for the past seven years. There are many injustices in the world that are casually ignored and the killing of civilians in eastern Afghanistan is one of them. Pakistan’s killing of Afghan civilians isn’t even recognized by the U.S. or the Pakistani government. Recognizing the massacres is the least anyone could do. But since Afghan civilians are labeled as “terrorists” by Pakistan, no one questions why they attack eastern Afghanistan almost daily. 

This really is an ignored issue. I have to dig and dig just to find out if any news channels have covered the massacres. Even Afghan news channels stay lazy on this issue. Doesn’t anybody think the Afghans in eastern Afghanistan have dreams and ambitions? That their only wish is peace? That they are not involved in terrorist activities? That they live in fear daily because there are Pakistani missiles, jets and helicopters over their heads? 

While the criminals in the Pakistani Army can celebrate Eid with their families, the Afghan families affected by Pakistani missiles have to worry about how to rebuild their houses and where to bury their loved ones. But none of this will get recognition outside of Afghanistan, because like I said, Afghan civilians are labeled as terrorists and therefore the massacres never happened. 



On July 26, 2014, Pakistan fired 10 missiles into Kunar province in eastern Afghanistan, as usual. The missiles hit a civilan home and injured a child. The house has been damaged and the child is in critical condition. 

I believe the deepest pit of hell is reserved for the Pakistani Army, among others. They are killing and injuring poor, defenseless people and ruining their houses, launching airstrikes and violating Afghan airspace with their jets. For seven years, the eastern provinces of Kunar, Nuristan, Paktia, Paktika, Khost and Nangarhar have all been attacked and continue to be attacked by the U.S.-backed Pakistani Army while Afghanistan rarely fires back. 



Stamps of Pashtunistan (North-western Pakistan, eastern and southern Afghanistan), dating back to the Soviet invasion. 

Via Delcampe





A Pashtun fighter of the Wazir tribe in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) during the Third Anglo-Afghan War in 1919. The NWFP now consists of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). 
Photograph by Major-General J G Fitzgerald. 

A Pashtun fighter of the Wazir tribe in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) during the Third Anglo-Afghan War in 1919. The NWFP now consists of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). 

Photograph by Major-General J G Fitzgerald



WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN. An Afghan Kyrgyz girl milks the family yak. 
Photograph by Matthieu Paley. 

WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN. An Afghan Kyrgyz girl milks the family yak. 

Photograph by Matthieu Paley



Suspected Taliban militants have killed 15 Afghan civilians execution-style after stopping two vehicles travelling in central Afghanistan.

The armed attackers killed 11 men, three women and one child late on Thursday night in Ghor Province.

According to local authorities, the gunmen made the vehicles pull over and ordered everyone out, after which they lined the passengers up on the side of the road and shot them one by one.

“One man managed to flee. All of the others were shot in the head and chest,” according to Ghor provincial police chief Fahim Qaiem.

No group has yet claimed responsibility for the heinous crime, which took place on the same day that two Finnish female aid workers were shot dead by unidentified gunmen in the western city of Herat.

Meanwhile, at least 6 civilians were killed and more than 20 were injured after a bomber on a explosive-packed motorcycle in Takhar Province blew himself and his vehicle up in a busy market.

The United States and its allies invaded Afghanistan in 2001 as part of Washington’s so-called war on terror. The offensive removed the Taliban from power, but years into the invasion, the country is still grappling with widening insecurity.



HERAT, AFGHANISTAN. Vendors and horse carts of goods near the ancient citadel. 
Photograph by James L. Stanfield.

HERAT, AFGHANISTAN. Vendors and horse carts of goods near the ancient citadel. 

Photograph by James L. Stanfield.



WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN. An Afghan Kyrgyz boy plays while the family’s clothes are drying, laid out on the summer grass.
Photograph by Matthieu Paley. 

WAKHAN CORRIDOR, AFGHANISTAN. An Afghan Kyrgyz boy plays while the family’s clothes are drying, laid out on the summer grass.

Photograph by Matthieu Paley



“Detainees in US custody in Abu Ghraib [Iraq], Kandahar and Bagram [Afghanistan] (where many were taken to before Guantanamo) have reported being sodomised with broomsticks, a ‘chemical light’ or rifles. Other forms of sexual humiliation reported have been; parading men naked in front of female soldiers, forcing them to wear women’s underwear and dance with other men, forcing them to undress in front of female interrogators and guards, touching their genitals or provoking them in a ‘humiliating’ way and forcing them to watch pornography. Most detainees in U.S. custody have alleged that they were either raped, threatened with rape, or anally probed. Sexual violence is a war crime. Sexual humiliation is used to induce feelings of humiliation and fear.”